Hey Neighbor! Meet: Wake Breakers

Not exactly sure if they qualify as “neighbors” so much as “roommates” — since they have become our first Cohere Bandwidth member band! We plan to see Wake Breakers quite a bit in our shared rehearsal space in downtown Fort Collins. Possibly in their bathrobes, or in whatever they feel comfortable wearing around the house. Like pirate-punk eye patches.

Hey Neighbor! Meet: Wake Breakers

Landlocked - Hey Neighbor!

Wake Breakers taking a moment to pose at our private opening party. Photo: Chromatic || Craig Okraska

How long have you been together as a band?
Since February 2015.

What made you decide to seek out shared rehearsal space?
Because the conditions were bad in our past space: no air conditioning, small, not enough equipment.

Editor's Note: Here's a "before" picture of Landlocked at practice. Hot. Cramped. Decidedly not five-star.

Here’s a “before” picture of Wake Breakers at practice. Hot. Cramped. Sad pirates. Photo credit: Mom

What do you do for work … and play?
Group hacky sack. Video games. Abe teaches uke. Trip and Parker have dreams. (<<Editor’s Note: this is what we *think* this read; the interview sheet was completed with a certain amount of youthful zest. We hope Trip and Parker have dreams. Everybody has a dream.)

Who are the members of your band?
Trip: Vocals and guitar
Parker: Lead guitar
Abe: Bass
Sam: Drums

Band Manager: Michael Goldstrom

How did you meet?
School.

What makes your band unique?
Pirate Punk
Young — and with talent and publicity
Editor: they’re not kidding about the publicity — see below for a photo of  Wake Breakers at band practice celebrating their front page Coloradoan feature story:

Landlocked - Coloradoan

And here’s a story via the Rocky Mountain Collegian complete with a video interview:

Any goals you’re working toward as a band?
More publicity
More gigs and $

Current soundtrack to a day in your life?
FIDLAR
Jack White
The Growlers

Are there any other local bands you find inspiring?
The Burroughs
Wire Faces

What’s the most important thing you accomplish at band practice?
Improving music and band coherence

Where can people find your music?

Upcoming Shows: playing Northern Colorado Pride
(Pride OUTside – August 1)

Connect Online:

Rehearsing: at Cohere Bandwidth!

COHERE BANDWIDTH OPENS REHEARSAL SPACE IN DOWNTOWN FORT COLLINS

Shared practice space for local musicians to celebrate grand opening on June 27 in Old Town

Arliss Nancy courtesy Craig Okraska of Chromatic

Arliss Nancy courtesy Craig Okraska of Chromatic

Fort Collins, Colo., June 9, 2015 — After two and a half years of planning, preparation and construction, Cohere Bandwidth announced today that it will open its doors on Saturday, June 27 for musicians looking for rehearsal space. Two fully backlined practice rooms featuring high-quality gear, secure access and state-of-the-art sound mitigation are available for bands to book online at coherebandwidth.com starting today. Located at 317 Jefferson St. in downtown Fort Collins, Cohere Bandwidth is housed in the same building as The Downtown Artery’s new music venue, also scheduled to open June 27.

“While the entire process has been lengthy, the result is completely worth it,” said Cohere Bandwidth owner Angel Kwiatkowski. “The location couldn’t be more perfect. We’ve been able to construct this safe, comfortable, convenient workspace for musicians in the heart of Old Town Fort Collins, and it’s housed within the artistic ecosystem and creative community that’s blossoming at The Downtown Artery. The entire building is filled with people helping, inspiring and collaborating with one another, and the possibilities inherent in that are endless.”

Cohere Bandwidth offers plug-and-play hourly practice space for local and touring musicians, and was designed after extensive research and input gathered from several Colorado bands. Hourly rehearsal rates are set at $20, but a limited number of monthly memberships are also available at $145 for 8 hours of rehearsal time. Members of Cohere Bandwidth are also eligible for discounts and freebies from local merchants, including food, beer, gear, professional creative services, clothing, and more. Members also get advance priority access to booking, so they can choose and reserve regular rehearsal times in the Cohere Bandwidth schedule.

bandwidthmembercard

Kwiatkowski, who owns and operates Cohere Community (shared office space for independent creative professionals and remote workers), was motivated to create shared rehearsal space for musicians after hearing the story of local bands Fierce Bad Rabbit and Wire Faces having their practice space robbed.

“I was pretty horrified at the story, not just of the robbery, but of the conditions musicians typically work in,” she said. “The more I learned about what bands need in a practice space, the more parallels I saw between the coworking community and the music community. Why should our artists be forced to work in substandard conditions? They’re business owners, too, and deserve a workplace designed to suit their needs.”

To make sure the space continues to be inspired and guided by the musicians it serves, Kwiatkowski hired drummer Shane Zweygardt of Wire Faces as Cohere Bandwidth’s General Manager.

shane incognito

“It feels good to know that one of the musicians that was the catalyst for this whole project is now helping to run the rehearsal space,” Kwiatkowski said. “Shane is one of the most respected artists in the community and his input has been invaluable as we build the space.” Zweygardt was formerly a long-time employee of Colorado Drum and Percussion, the now-defunct local music store that was once in the building Cohere Bandwidth occupies.

rocksolid

Cohere Bandwidth will host a private party for friends and family on Friday, June 26, but has purposely scheduled the public opening of the practice spaces to coincide with the Downtown Artery’s venue grand opening, to demonstrate the synergy and camaraderie between the two businesses. “They’re the best neighbors we could ask for and we can’t wait to celebrate with them,” Kwiatkowski said.

Cohere Bandwidth offers 24/7 access via unique door key codes. Online booking for June 27 and dates beyond is available immediately. Bands can register online at coherebandwidth.com and purchase hourly rehearsal time or monthly membership as needed.

The Downtown Artery venue grand opening on June 27 features Denver bands Itchy-O, Super Bummer and Panther Martin, along with Fort Collins favorites Stella Luce.

###

Cohere Bandwidth and Cohere Community

MEDIA CONTACT: Angel Kwiatkowski

angel@coherecommunity.com

(970) 219-4061

www.coherebandwidth.com

317 Jefferson St., Fort Collins, CO 80524

 

For more information about The Downtown Artery, please contact:
William Knudsen, Director of Marketing and Development

william@downtownartery.com – (970) 682-2668

www.downtownartery.com

252 Linden St., Fort Collins, CO 80524

Fix Your Band Practice With One Weird Trick

In a basement in Fort Collins, a viola player must sit because the ceiling isn’t tall enough for her bow extension. In a turkey coop down by the river, two bands get robbed on Christmas Eve. In a warehouse behind Link Lane, a drummer wishes for heat as his fingers go numb.

Rehearsing in Fort Collins feels like a terrible mad lib where the nouns are: basement, garage, shed, warehouse and barn and the adjectives are: infested, cold, hot, damp, dirty, cramped, terrifying, noisy and frustrating.

2012-12-28 21.23.55

The worst version of the mad lib words.

In a world where you could rehearse in your basement or garage, we want you to explore the reality of hourly shared rehearsal space in Old Town.

 

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One of 21 shared spaces at Austin’s The Space.

 

Here are 5 ways we’ll help you sound better:

1. We backlined our rooms with amps, bass rigs, PAs, mixers and microphones so you only need to tote your sticks and guitars. Stop putting unnecessary wear and tear on your beloved equipment and use ours!

Wire-Faces-pic

Wire Faces perfected the venue that is Menyus’s living room while Shane uses brush sticks.

2. If you’re practicing at home, you’re getting really good at playing the venue that is your garage or living room. Rehearsing in neutral territory better prepares your band for an actual performance especially when you can play at full volume without fear of the neighbors knocking.

3. Ever feel frustrated that your band rehearsals last 3 hours or more? Moreover, does your PARTNER/PARENT feel frustrated? By picking specific start and end times, you can all choose exactly how long you want practice to last (pro-tip, it’s usually less than 3 hours).

4. We planted our collective ass in Old Town for you. Be wildly productive during rehearsal at Cohere Bandwidth THEN go out for a beer together at any of the hundred places in Old Town.

5. Our rehearsal rooms will turn over about every 2 hours. That means there’s a really good chance you’ll run into other musicians. Meet, talk & play a show together, preferably next door at the Downtown Artery’s new venue. We even installed a “bat cave” that takes you directly from the Side A practice room onto the stage at the Artery’s Venue. WHUT?!

Your band can have a 2 hour rehearsal every week for $145 a month. And we added a gajillion other discounts at local businesses to rock your world.

Do the math.

2 person band=$73 each

3 person band=$48 each

4 person band=$36 each

5 person band=$29 each

 

CB Team Photo

 

Much love and go register today. You’ll get first dibs at the schedule when we open.

Turkey Coops Shut Down by Larimer County

turkey fu

Courtesy The Yawpers via Julie Sutter

The Turkey Coops turned band rehearsal spaces have been on our radar for years. We first heard about them when our friends who were practicing in these “renovated” coops, Wire Faces and Fierce Bad Rabbit, were ROBBED. A truck pulled up to their unit in the middle of the night about 2 years ago, cut the lock and absconded with ~$15,000 worth of their beloved equipment. The case is still unsolved (missing gear list).

2012-12-28 21.23.55

A turkey coop rehearsal space (post-robbery)

This tragedy is what spurred the creation of Cohere Bandwidth in the first place and it feels a little like our turkey coop story arc is coming full circle. We found out late last night that Larimer County has shut down the turkey coops due to zoning violations (author’s note: and crimes against artistry). Bands have been practicing in these unheated, unsecured, improperly zoned and unsound-proofed plywood rooms where turkeys formerly awaited their pre-Thanksgiving deaths. Bands didn’t elect to practice in these coops because it’s cheap or semi-convenient or goddamn freezing cold in the winter. They practiced there because it was their only viable option to make music and try to stay off the radar and out of their neighbors’ hair.

Deplorable conditions aside, we’re proud to be building rock solid rehearsal space in Old Town Fort Collins BOTH to prevent the mistreatment of our community’s most creative assets and to send a message that MUSIC MATTERS.

That’s why we’re offering a whole month of free rehearsal to each of the three bands that have been displaced from the turkey coops. We never want bands to have to practice in less than ideal conditions ever again in Fort Collins. We won’t stand for it.

If your band has been displaced from the turkey coops, please email Shane right away and request your free month. We’ll be open in about 4 weeks at 317 Jefferson Street under the Downtown Artery.

Bands we know about: Bomb Threat, Endless Monster, Chieftain.

Field Report: Rehearse in Space

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Are we there yet?! Are we there yet?! Shane has been bugging me for MONTHS to visit Space in Austin, Texas. It was hard to say yes given our lack of wheels down here and the distance to get there (a 30 min drive from downtown READ $50 Uber ride each way).

As luck would have it, I arrived in Austin and met a brand new coworking space owner, Shelley, who was willing to give us a ride! Her coworking space is called Orange Coworking and is located in the “Far South Awesome” neighborhood.

FullSizeRender (12)

We landed in Space and begged for a spur of the moment tour. They acquiesced despite being wicked busy due to SXSW. Brent showed us around all the Space, which includes THIRTY-ONE rehearsal rooms spread over two floors and a tracking room/recording studio.

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Most of the rehearsal rooms are hourly/shared just like Cohere Bandwidth’s will be be but they offer just the PA, mixer, mic stands and the occasional drum kit. Bands can either bring their own amps/rigs OR rent some from Space. A small number of rooms are reserved full time for a few specific bands.

FullSizeRender (9)

I made Shane wail on a drum kit while I stood in the hallway with not 1 but 2 solid doors separating us. I’ve never been more thankful for the sound-lock vestibules our contractors are currently building.

FullSizeRender (14) FullSizeRender (10)

Summary: we are even MORE excited to bring this awesome concept to Old Town Fort Collins. Join us for our first open house day on April 24th! **we’re waiting on our new address but find us on the Jefferson side of Linden and Jefferson underneath the Downtown Artery.

Ps. Get on our wait list for rehearsal slots

Pps. Rock a Bandwidth hoodie

Rock ‘n’ Stole: Gear. Gone. Gah!

We know way too many bands who have had their instruments and equipment stolen. (Knowing just one is enough, really). Local bands getting ripped off was, in fact, the impetus for Cohere Bandwidth’s inception, and even though we feel like we’re doing our best to create lemonade — some jerk is always showing up with more lemons and making our musician friends miserable.
Such tales are far too abundant. Unfortunately, if you keep reading, you’ll hear another one. Fort Collins musicians Daisy and Brian (she of local bad-ass band The B.A.B.E.S. and he, the bass player for SpokesBUZZ bands Wasteland Hop AND The Echo Chamber) recently had their stuff stolen. We think that sucks.

If there is good news, it’s this: you can help. Here are some ways to do so:

  • A Community Funded project has launched where you can donate funds to help directly with gear replacement, and with Daisy and Brian’s upcoming trip to Austin for the Colorado Music Party. Check it out and give if you can.
  • Speaking of the road to Texas and supporting local bands: there’s a kickoff party in Fort Collins on Sat. March 14 that will feature several musicians headed to Austin (The B.A.B.E.S. among them). You can buy tickets for that and help put some money in their pockets that way.
  • There is also a similar sendoff event in Denver on Fri. March 6 being organized by Illegal Pete’s (Wasteland Hop is playing that one). Buy tickets here for the South Broadway shows.
  • (Super-depressing side note: if you search “stole” on Community Funded you get the Cohere Bandwidth launch project where Wire Faces tells their tale of thievery. However: “successfully funded” is nice. People are nice. Most of ’em. Also: Shane has since purchased insurance for his gear, a mere $14/mo. for $10K in coverage! So that’s sort of a lemonade of its own. Or at least an Arnold Palmer.)

We will let you know if we hear of more ways to help these bands recover their financial losses, if not their gear. It’ll be impossible to “replace” their things, of course — read on if you want to get sad and mad, and then fired up to help them out.

Here’s Daisy and Brian:

Daisy and Brian

We’re two local musicians who had our car broken into while it was parked in our driveway.

…and here, in their own words, is their “Rock ‘n’ Stole” story:

It’s just stuff, right?

Metal and plastic and inanimate things that can be replaced.
Just strings and tin and carbon fiber.
That’s what we had to keep telling ourselves as we smoked too many cigarettes, drove on autopilot, ignored texts. No one was hurt, right? I mean hell, there wasn’t even any damage to the car.
It was just stuff.
Some idiot, some dope fiend, some whatever had broken into our car the night before. The CR-V is an unassuming loser of a car. It’s covered in stickers from New Jersey to California. Its windshield is cracked.
And on the Sunday night after Valentine’s Day, it’s broken into by a thief. Broken into while parked in the driveway. Broken into while the cul-de-sac suburbia neighborhood we live in is soundly sleeping.
Broken into and relieved of close to five thousand dollars of our musical gear.
Our life work.
It’s just stuff, right?
After the moment of panic, the “did we bring it in and forget,” the call to the police, the reeling, Daisy found herself half-sitting, half-lying on the driveway, laughing and screaming and crying all at once like a madwoman.
They had played a show the night before. They’d gotten home at two in the morning, and after driving down to Denver and rocking out, they figured it’d be fine.
She couldn’t understand how it had happened, really.
It’s fine, we live in a little neighborhood far from downtown.
It’s fine, the doors are locked.
It’s fine, it’s only one night, we’ve done it before and nothing happened. 
It’s fine, it’s just stuff.  
Except that stuff is her first and only electric guitar, the Flying V she worked her ass off for to buy herself when she made up her mind to make music her life.
And the pedals – Jesus Christ, the pedalboard she’d painstakingly researched and put together.
Fast forward to the hole in my chest.
The churning in my stomach.
The thought that I have to call my mom and tell her the pedalboard she got me for my birthday in December is gone.
The pedalboard her and my dad ordered custom for me.
The pedalboard they sent to me saying
We want you to keep doing what you love.
We want you to play music
We want to help –
Here.
And some fucking asshole just broke into my car and took it.
Took it for whatever reason that will never make sense to me, and there’s nothing we can do about it.
Daisy collapsed back on the driveway, the crying over but the terrible, gnawing, twisting in her gut remaining.
But it’s just stuff, right?

Brian was on total cruise control the whole day. At first it was a typical morning – wake up, pound some coffee, get ready to meet up with Wasteland Hop, the local indie hip-hop group he plays bass in. Then the panic. The police report. The brief false hope. It wasn’t until the band was practicing that night it hit him like a sucker punch to the stomach.
It wasn’t so much like getting the wind knocked out of him. It was like having his lungs ripped out and being put on mass life support, the doctor is the police officer shrugging and saying
That’s really all we can do.
A loaner bass graciously arrives. just in time for practice that same day.
Some purple, good enough, get-the-job-done bass.
It wasn’t until his fingertips were stumbling and skipping over unfamiliar fretboards that the finality of our crisis started to creep in.
I’ve had that bass for ten years.
It’s been to Los Angeles, Wisconsin, Alaska, Austin – you name it. 
It’s been a part of so many projects, it’s been thrown across stages, it’s been abused and loved and the ultimate tool of my trade.
Yeah, remember that time –
No, don’t. Because it’s gone.
Just like that, the thing I used to fashion my soul into a vehicle others could understand and hopefully find help in, is gone.
Brian got through practice quietly suffering, pushing memories of shows and songs out of his head.
It’s just stuff, right?

They drove to Cheyenne the next day, an ultimately useless endeavor. Pawn shops ignored them, the police refused to file a report because the case originated in Colorado.
Out of their jurisdiction.
Out of their hands.
Out of their minds.
It didn’t seem to matter to them that someone could drive an hour north with our gear and it would be lost forever. See, in Wyoming, the pawn shops don’t use the same checking system for serial numbers that Colorado does. So even if something is reported missing in Colorado, complete with serial numbers and description, Wyoming doesn’t get that information.
So Brian and Daisy dropped of their information at as many pawn shops as they could before they had to head back to Fort Collins for work. And all the time, there’s that gnawing feeling.

This biting, tearing, awful plague creeping in them.
As musicians, that’s all we had.
The stuff we sunk everything we had into because we love to create, we have to create.
The stuff we bought instead of food.
The stuff we found sense in when everything else was chaos.
The stuff we used to make audiences happy, angry, awed, dance.
The stuff we worked our asses off for.
The stuff we had just perfected for the upcoming South By South West showcases.
The stuff we treasured and loved.
The stuff we kept our souls in.
But it’s just stuff, right?

Save the Date for Cinemusico: This is Spinal Tap!

While we (kind of) patiently wait out Cohere Bandwidth construction this winter, we keep looking for ways to support and connect with our community. Because that’s our favorite part anyway, and it requires zero hard hats. Fortunately, our friends at SpokesBUZZ have just the ticket for keeping our minds off our winter woes. And better yet: it’s a movie ticket! Our favorite nonprofit is bringing back Cinemusico — their music-meets-movies event series that brings songs and cinema together onscreen. The event includes the usual music community camaraderie, with local bands screening their music videos prior to a feature-length music-centric film. Cohere Bandwidth is proud to sponsor the first Cinemusico of 2015 on Thursday, Feb. 26 at 6 p.m., at the Lyric Cinema Cafe.

Cinemusico-26-Feb-2015

While the last week in February might seem like a distant point on the horizon, let us explain why you should buy a ticket NOW:

  • SpokesBUZZ hasn’t hosted a Cinemusico event since 2012 … and the community tends to turn up in force, bands AND fans
  • This particular Cinemusico will feature music videos by known rockers and current SpokesBUZZ bands Wiredogs and Shatterproof …
  • …AND a brand-new video from SpokesBUZZ alumni band Wire Faces. They haven’t release a music video in 9 months, not since Space Age Trees. It’s like we’ve all been pregnant with anticipation.
  • The new Wire Faces video includes a star-studded cast of young local actors, including members of Slow Caves and Yettie
  • …PLUS it is the product of the geniuses over at NoCoast Artists, including director Tomas Herrera

And that’s just the stuff that happens before the featured movie starts. Cinemusico’s featured movie this time around?

This is Spinal Tap

That’s right, the Rob Reiner rock-mockumentary that Time Out London named The Best Comedy Film. EVER. The only movie that IMDB rates on a scale of one to ELEVEN. The movie that celebrated its 30th birthday last year but still remains ridiculously relevant to rock and roll. We’re so excited to see it with you that it’s as if there’s a cucumber in our pants. And if that doesn’t ring any bells for you, well then you’d really better be there to brush up on your legendary rock films.

Our favorite part of the whole event is the part where we get to hang out with some of our beloved local musicians and laugh and clap and watch music movies together. We’re not gonna lie. However, it’s also pretty neat that a portion of the evening’s proceeds will support SpokesBUZZ, which is why we’re so happy to kick down for the cause. We hope you’ll get a ticket and join us for Cinemusico on Feb. 26!

Cohere Bandwidth: Kicking It Into Gear

If you’re wondering what all that racket is, well: we’re movin’ and shakin’ over at Cohere Bandwidth. Not so very long ago in the saga of shared rehearsal space, we were getting giddy about structure and infrastructure, and waxing poetic about Magic Mick, of acoustic architecture fame. (Update — digging up the dough to hire Mick has been the smartest money we’ve spent thus far, by far. As in, spend a little, and save a LOT in the long run, that kind of smart.) Since we’re feeling pretty solid about our sound decisions, it’s time to spend some more money, this time to outfit the practice spaces with gear. But what to buy first?

The heart of the band seemed like a good place to start, and to bypass any potential arrhythmia in the process, Angel decided to immediately purchase one of the more critical components of our backline equipment: the drums. To neatly evade any repercussions we might experience from making ill-informed choices, she also immediately enlisted some expertise. She hired this guy:

Shane

Actual drummer! Not to scale.

You might remember Shane from such escapades as “the time we shut him in a portable room to play drums in sub-zero temperatures” or “the time we made him practice in the living room while we listened outside from the curb”. In addition to being a cheerful test subject and one of our favorite actual drummers, Shane also happens to work next door at the drum store and not only knows what he’s talking about, he knows where to get it. Angel went shopping and immediately came home with this sweet kit:

fraggle rock

j/k… she wishes. #notforsale

Making Things Click
As you might recall, one of the primary reasons we started this whole shared rehearsal space project was due to a strong belief that, just like any other businessperson, a musician needs a nice, normal, properly equipped place to work. Angel already knows a thing or two about outfitting a shared workspace, and one of her other strong beliefs is that she, as the owner and community manager, needs to know what’s up with the office equipment. If the going gets tough in Internet land at Cohere, when the com has been cast and the router is pouting, Angel’s the one that endures the tech call required to diagnose the problem. She is the great plugger and unplugger, the one who talks to surly onsite service repairmen, the Restorer of All That Is Right With the World.

Tech Support

Actual tech support call! Exasperation not to scale.

So why, she thought, should owning a shared rehearsal space be any different? Without further ado, Angel purchased a non-Fraggle drum kit from Shane … along with a series of drum lessons.

User instruction manual.

Adult Education
Armed with a  fierce determination and a high school marching band background (legacy: the possibility of playing “ironic jazz flute” at Musak-enhanced business networking mixers), Angel is practicing. Practicing assembling the kit, and learning the proper grip and foot positioning (it matters). Practicing patience and persistence in pursuit of improved on-the-job performance. And, practicing, because according to Shane, she might get to learn how to play Billie Jean pretty soon.

Angel Lessons

Keeping her fingers on the pulse of practice space.

Shane reports that Angel is a good student; Angel’s report: “Shane is fun, drumming is hard, and OMG there’s so much to haul!”  Her next move is to buy a throne, as is befitting the new queen of all she surveys. Well, it’s mostly so she can stop sitting on a child’s chair with a pillow in her basement practice space. After that: probably headphones and earplugs and cymbals. But eventually? She looks forward to practicing in a proper rehearsal space. Good thing we have a couple of those on the way.

P.S. wanna take drum lessons from Shane? Email him — he’s accepting new students of all ages.

P.P.S. we’re bringing back the local music track sample in our posts. Hey, here’s one:
Chain of Command by Wire Faces

Musician Field Report: A Case for Space

(Remember when we went on a field trip to visit Denver rehearsal spaces? Ian paid extra attention, clever musician that he is. We asked him to write this week’s post about his subsequent experience as a happy shared rehearsal space customer, and to fill us in on why a Fort Collins space is as important as ever for bands … and fans).

I have spent the past 10 years actively playing in the Colorado music scene with two different bands, Wire Faces and The Jimi Austin (RIP). Currently we are in our 10th rehearsal space, which daylights as a drum lesson room that sits directly below office space and an apartment. This equates to limited hours, no amplifiers, and no PA system; when we do rehearse, we plug our guitars and mics directly into an interface that allows us to listen via headphones. Although it works, it certainly does not provide one with the necessary experience needed to prepare for a big, loud show.

The rest of the time, we record in our drummer Shane’s bedroom… it’s very intimate, and he has a blanket with cats all over it and Cinderella pillows, which is nice but somewhat incongruent with a band known to play “wild rock”.

musiciansinbed

Each rehearsal space we have had over the years has ultimately resulted in us either being forced out or choosing to leave under some form of duress. We have never been disrespectful tenants, however generally people don’t want loud music next to their living space or place of business. We’ve practiced in living rooms, basements, storage facilities, and gone long periods of time without any place to play at all, which can get weird. Even if I tried, I could not estimate the number of shows we’ve had to play while forgoing a proper rehearsal, or any rehearsal for that matter. Thus creating a possible increase in pre-show anxiety and a much higher potential for missed notes, forgotten lyrics or chords, stick drops, and other unexpected musical blunders.

Subsequently, I have stumbled into seeing the true benefits of a shared space that charges an hourly rate (it only took me 10 years). Although it can be ideal to have a space in which all of your equipment is set up and ready to go the moment you walk in the room, we haven’t been able to find such a place in well over a year – before that we were usually on some sort of wait list or scouring Craigslist for options because whatever we had at the time was insufficient. But I digress. You get the point.

ampcramp

Fortunately, Wire Faces is currently utilizing RocketSpace Rehearsal Studios and Lesson Space, located in Denver. The space has proven to be extremely convenient, and I am not sure what we would have done without the ability to quickly book a few hours of rehearsal time in order to prepare for a big show. Our most recent experiences at RocketSpace saved collective our Wire Ass; without the availability of an hourly room, we would not have been able to rehearse before our trip to SXSW for the Colorado Music Party, or for our recent show for Red Bull Sound Select with The Joy Formidable and The Epilogues last Tuesday. Since we do not currently have access to facilities in Fort Collins that provide us with what is required for a genuine rehearsal, this has been a fantastic option. The downside: it’s not in Fort Collins.

RocketSpace provides a backline (drum kit, bass and guitar amps, a PA, microphones, and cables) and all we have to do is show up, plug in and play. Each room is retrofitted with professional acoustic sound baffling, adequate lighting, and ample electrical outlets and power strips. Did I mention it’s affordable, and they take credit/debit cards? Well it is, and they do. Funk, mariachi, metal, hip-hop, rock, even guitar and voice lessons are some of the diverse sounds emanating from each of the rehearsal rooms. During our last rehearsal at RocketSpace, a nice gentleman gave us his card and asked if we’d be interested in playing a show with his band because he liked what he heard from the hallway. These rooms not only provide a much-needed working space for musicians, but also cater to the inconsistent nature of a musician’s schedule, while fostering both networking and collaboration.

This is why we, via our support of Cohere Bandwidth, are so driven to create a shared rehearsal space in Fort Collins. Although there are already several locations in Denver somewhat consistent with RocketSpace, a counterpart does not exist in Fort Collins. These existing spaces have proven the business model, as well as the necessary demand; RocketSpace is actually in the process of planning an expansion. So although you may be growing weary of hearing what IS NOT (yet) available in Fort Collins, I’d like to remind you what IS possible. We are not giving up until a quality, affordable, secure, shared rehearsal space exists in the Fort Collins area. Our musicians deserve it, and so do their fans.

~Ian Haygood, field tripper, Cohere Bandwidth co-catalyst, Wire Faces guitarist

 

 

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  • We are just $388 away from our $1,800 sales goal. Remember, if we miss the target, we close 30 days later. 😬😬😬
  • When your sales goal for the month is $1,800, and you're a full week in with only $168
  • Our management team is rocking in full force this week!  Catch Stella Luce at @surfside_7 tonight and @wirefaces at the @downtownartery this Thursday!
  • We've purchased our signature 12 pack of good beer and 30 rack of shitty beer. See you soon for happy hour!
  • Goddamn ya'll. This is the best thing to wake up to. Thank you!
  • Hey Spinal Tap, you left your #zucchini in Side B. #fortcollins #vegetable #aluminumfoil #tsa #metaldetector
  • As promised, here is where we are towards the goal this month. Book early, book often or we shutter our sound treated doors forever. Http://cohere bandwidth.com
  • 100+ and the signal is still good. #worldrecordattempt #guitarpedals #effectspedal #fortcollins #musicians #daisychainformiles

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